Standards

General

OFFICER

COUNSELOR

Parole Agent

GS001 - KSA

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES
(KSA) STANDARD
GS001

 

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

It is the CPOST’s intention to thoroughly and efficiently review training against established training standards and adult learning theory, establishing a common understanding of training principles.

STANDARD

All Correctional Peace Officers will be trained in the Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSA) necessary to effectively perform their scope of duties.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

  • Knowledge is the understanding of what laws, regulations, policies and procedures apply to the subject. It would also include the “why” and “how”. 
  • Skills are the student’s ability to apply Knowledge to the lesson. Basic learning theory is clear that skills must be practiced to be retained.  The amount of practice must be determined by the complexity and difficulty of skill as well if the new skill is replacing an existing habit. 
  • Abilities are the student’s ability to use both the Knowledge portion of the training along with the practiced Skills in the correct context and situation in scenario or a real life setting.

CITATIONS

  • DOM 32010.4 Training Defined
  • Government Code Sections 19995 – 19995.5
GS002 - CORE SUBJECTS

CORE SUBJECTS STANDARD
GS002

 

 

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

There are core subjects that are fundamental principles of behavior and decision making necessary to becoming a successful and productive correctional peace officer.  These skill sets are usually not taught in single presentations but are infused throughout all training. A successful correctional peace officer must be able to master these principles and perform accordingly on the work site.

STANDARD

All Correctional Peace Officer training will be evaluated taking into consideration the basic principles of Authority, Communication, Ethics, and Safety.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

  • AUTHORITY –The understanding and ability of how and when to use or not use vested authority including force options but also including situational awareness and de-escalation techniques.
  • COMMUNICATION – The ability to effectively communicate either in writing, orally or with body language.
  • ETHICS – The ability to do the right thing including following legal requirements and departmental values while demonstrating a high professional standard of behavior.
  • SAFETY – Professional behavior that provides for personal safety but also the ability to provide protection and safety of others under dangerous and stressful conditions.

 

 

These critical principles of work performance are not independent of each other but are instead always linked.   A failure to adequately apply one will inevitably result in misuse of others.  A misuse of authority is unethical behavior.  A simple failure of communication in a critical situation can result in an unnecessary safety risk to everyone involved.  A successful correctional peace officer operates within these four principles of work performance whenever possible.

GS003 - ON-THE-JOB TRAINING (OJT)

ON-THE-JOB TRAINING STANDARD
GS003

 

 

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13603(b): The CPOST shall determine the on-the-job training requirements for correctional peace officers.

DEFINITION

On-the-Job Training (OJT) is defined as formal training approved by a supervisor (or a designated employee with the required expertise under the direction of the supervisor) at the job site while the employee is working.

BACKGROUND

Supervisors are responsible during the normal course of business to provide direction and guidance to employees as to their assigned duties. When this direction and guidance is formalized as OJT, which may be provided by the supervisor or delegated to a designated employee with the required expertise, then such training shall be documented. 

STANDARD

Each CDCR custody staff is to receive a minimum of 12 hours of OJT annually.  It is the responsibility of the hiring authority to provide on-the-job training through its supervisory ranks to employees as needed and as the working conditions allows.  OJT will be documented by the supervisor via CDCR Form 844 or recorded in the employee’s training records.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

  1. OJT may be provided to an employee in either a classroom or work setting to ensure performance of job skills are compliant, and knowledge of acceptable practices or policies are current.
    1. OJT may also be used as a method to correct performance deficiencies.

 

  1. Appropriate training may be most conducive at the employee’s worksite where the immediate supervisor or a designated employee with the required expertise may provide the OJT.
  1. It must be documented in the employee’s training record via the CDCR Form 844.

CITATIONS

  • DOM Section 32010.4 – On-the-Job Training:

Formal training conducted by a supervisor (or a designated employee with the required expertise under the direction of a supervisor) at the job site, or in a classroom setting while the employee is working.

  • DOM Section 32010.10 – Minimum Required Training:

Required training for custody staff is defined as follows: 52 hours of completed training, which includes 40 hours of IST and at least 12 hours of on-the-job training (OJT), while meeting all requirements on the annual training schedule. Minimum required training for non-custody staff is defined as follows: 18 hours of completed training, which includes 8 hours of IST and at least 10 hours of OJT, formal IST or out-service training, while meeting all requirements on the annual training schedule. The hiring authority or Associate Director of POSED, or designee, can increase minimum requirements as needed.

  • DOM Section 32010.8.1 – Training Resources – On the Job Training:

OJT is provided to employees in either a classroom or work setting to ensure acceptable levels of performance and knowledge, and to correct deficiencies. When appropriate, IST managers/training coordinators are encouraged to fully utilize this type of training as opposed to off-site training or on-site training that does not fall within the trainee’s regular work hours.

  • DOM Section 33030.8.1.2 – On-the-Job Training:

When OJT is ordered, the supervisor shall complete section two of the memorandum form “Order for Formal IST or Documentation of OJT” and shall complete the CDCR Form 844, Training Participation Sign-In Sheet. The employee shall be given the opportunity to sign the CDCR Form 844 to indicate his or her participation in discussion and acknowledge receiving and understanding the training provided. Orders for OJT and completed OJT documentation shall be filed in the employee’s supervisory file.

  • CDCR Memorandum Dated March 30, 2018:

“Clarification of Bargaining Unit 6 On-the-Job Training and Operating Procedures Notice Requirements”- written jointly by Kathleen Allison, Director of DAI and Candace Murch, Chief of OLR.

GS004 - STRESS RESILIENCY

STRESS RESILIENCY STANDARD
GS004

 

 

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(e): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the training of state Correctional Peace Officers in the Department in the handling of stress associated with their duties. 

BACKGROUND

One of the greatest threats to a Correctional Peace Officer’s well-being involves the cumulative stress they will encounter as a result of their occupation. If not properly managed, stress increases the potential for a Correctional Peace Officer to suffer a variety of physical, emotional, and psychological issues that can overflow into their personal lives with devastating negative effects, or vice versa. Raising officer awareness of the inherent stresses of working in a correctional environment will better prepare them for the job as a Correctional Peace Officer. It will encourage them to implement stress resilient strategies, techniques, and resources as a lifestyle tool to maintain mental, physical, and emotional wellness.

STANDARD

All CDCR custody staff shall be afforded stress resiliency/management training annually.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

Currently, this training is being administered through the BCOA, BPAA, and BCJA, as well as annually through In-Service-Training. Correctional Peace Officers across all classifications are tasked with responsibility under intense and daunting conditions, and at times, the minimum required training/education may not be sufficient to address the mental health and wellness of the officer. In cases where an officer is displaying signs of mental or emotional fatigue (work-related or personal) in the form of irregular attendance, a notable decline in quality of work product, or other documented signs of stress, the officer shall be offered the opportunity to attend additional training or education in mental health resiliency. This training may take place in various forms including, self-directed learning (e.g., Learning Management System [LMS]), Employee Assistance Program referral, the Peer Support Program, mentoring, or coaching, and/or any other available means of training based on the worksite. 

CITATION

  • DOM Section 33030.8.1.2 – On-the-Job Training
  • Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in United States Corrections Professionals: Prevalence and Impact on Health and Functioning By Caterina G. Spinaris, PhD, Michael D. Denhof, PhD, and Julie A. Kellaway, PhD
  • American Correctional Officers
  • American Institute of Stress <http://www.stress.org/>
  • American Physiological Society <http://www.the-aps.org/>
  • Anxiety and Depression Association of America <https://www.adaa.org/>
  • Desert Waters – Correctional Outreach, <http://desertwaters.com>
  • National Institution of Corrections http://nicic.gov/
  • California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Office of Employee Wellness

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Learning Management System (LMS) stress-related courses:

  • Managing Workplace Stress – Online; Duration: 0.10 hour; BET ID: Informational Video

Workplace stress will remain a reality of modern business for the foreseeable future, but there are strategies to consider when evaluating how best to anticipate and manage work-related pressures. This video is for informational purposes only and not worth training credit. 

  • Optimizing Your Work/Life Balance: Taking Control of Your Stress – Online; Duration: 1 hour; BET ID: 11058654

In ‘Occupational Stress,’ Stephen Palmer wrote ‘Stress is the psychological, physiological and behavioral response by an individual when they perceive a lack of equilibrium between the demands placed upon them and their ability to meet those demands, which, over a period of time, leads to ill-health.’ Are you constantly adding items to your to-do list and it seems like your list never shrinks? Are you feeling overwhelmed at work and at home? Are you afraid that stress is starting to negatively impact your health and relationships? Stress is produced by your own feelings and reactions to certain external events, rather than by the events themselves. And while you may not always be able to control the external events that are causing you stress, you can control your reactions to them and how you handle them.
This course will explain how the signs and symptoms of stress could be of physiological, behavioral, and psychological nature and where these stresses can come from. This course reviews strategies for coping with stress and avoiding burnout. The course also covers how you can positively change your responses to stress once you are able to recognize how you respond to stressful situations. Relaxation techniques such as breathing and mediation are also covered. Materials designed to support blended learning activities aligned with this course are available from the Resources Page.

  • Navigating the Workplace with Emotional Intelligence – Online; Duration: .5 hour; BET ID: 11059064

Emotional intelligence in the workplace is everyone’s responsibility. In this course, you’ll learn about the role of emotional intelligence in workplace activities, conflict and stress management, influence and engagement, and teamwork. 

  • Creating Work/Life Balance – Online; Duration: 0.25 hour; BET ID: 11058889
    For working professionals, keeping up with the competing demands of office and home takes more than good time-management skills. It requires an ability to prioritize and set a healthy work/life balance. This Challenge Series exercise explores the ways that work/life balance can be created to minimize stress and maximize productivity.
  • Managing Attitudes During Difficult Times – Online; Duration: 1 hour; BET ID: 11058937
    Employees may experience fear, anxiety, and frustration when their company is going through difficult times. If employees’ attitudes suffer, so too does their performance. You must take steps to keep employees engaged, enthusiastic, and motivated when a company is facing challenges. By learning how to manage employee attitudes that often surface in difficult times, and by motivating and supporting employees, you can help boost the morale of everyone in your business. This course explains how stress manifests itself in employees when companies are going through challenging times, and it teaches techniques for reducing such stress. It also shows you how to develop a motivational style of leadership to maximize employee performance and reduce demotivating workplace behaviors. Finally, it gives you a chance to practice strategies for supporting employees through tough times.

 

  • Developing the Right Attitude for Performing Under Pressure – Online; Duration: 1 hour; BET ID: 11058895

With the right attitude, you can optimize your performance under pressure. Although meeting the challenge of high pressure situations is a different experience for everyone, one thing is constant: you need an attitude that leads to effective and efficient goal-oriented action. You won’t always be able to control the external events that lead to pressure, but you can control your reaction. This course helps you recognize the events and situations that cause you to feel pressure. It explains how you can understand your reaction to pressure, and how excessive stress can impair your performance. Finally, it covers the principles for managing your attitude so you stay in control and maintain a success-oriented mentality. Meeting high-pressure challenges is an opportunity for you to excel and build your reputation as someone who can be counted on.

GS005 - DE-ESCALATION TECHNIQUES

DE-ESCALATION TECHNIQUES STANDARD
GS005

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

PURPOSE

It is the policy of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s (CDCR) to accomplish custodial and correctional functions with minimal reliance on the use of force. Furthermore, CDCR is committed to resolving conflicts at the lowest and least invasive level. De-escalation techniques are designed to promote appropriate communication between correctional peace officers and offenders. CDCR values a correctional culture that promotes positive interaction between correctional staff and offenders. The strategies presented will assist officers in what to do or say to prevent a situation from escalating. Appropriate communication is a key component of professional conduct.

STANDARD

Correctional Peace Officers shall be knowledgeable and proficient in the use of De-escalation Techniques to stop an action, or mitigate a situation where conflict, or the potential for conflict, exists.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

  1. Use of De-escalation Techniques – The student shall be knowledgeable and proficient in the ability to use appropriate communication and recognize both verbal and non-verbal cues. The student shall be proficient in de-escalation techniques with a diverse population to minimize the necessity for the use of force.
  2. Problem Solving/Decision-Making – The student shall be knowledgeable and proficient in analyzing situations and implementing the various de-escalation techniques to solve problems in a timely manner; using verbal skills to determine the appropriate resolution to a situation, with minimal reliance on use of force to accomplish custodial duties.
  3. Officer Safety – The student shall demonstrate situational and tactical awareness and the ability to respond appropriately and be ready to use force options if necessary.
  4. Communication – The student shall use appropriate verbal and non-verbal skills to convey intended meaning and establish understanding in an effort to defuse potentially violent situations that could result in a use of force encounter.
  5. Ethics – The student shall abide by the code of ethics and accepted principles of conduct that govern decisions and actions based on professional values and expectations.
  6. Stress Tolerance and Emotional Regulation – The student shall maintain self-control and make timely, rational decisions in stressful situations.
  7. Competency – To establish competency a standard shall be measured in a pass/fail format to determine an officer’s ability to apply the techniques instructed.

CITATIONS

  • California Penal Code 13601(a)(1)
  • California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation DOM Article 2 51020.1 Use of Force
  • California Code of Regulations Title 15 Article 1.5 3268-Use of Force
GS006 - APPLICATION OF RESTRAINT GEAR

APPLICATION OF RESTRAINT GEAR STANDARD
GS006

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

The application of restraint devices (i.e., handcuffs, flexible handcuffs, waist restraints, martin chain, leg restraints, hand isolation devices, spit hood/masks, safety triangle, security box, and leather restraints) on a subject can be a difficult and potentially dangerous task for a peace officer.  Correctional Peace Officers must be proficient in the use of proper methods to ensure their safety and the safety of the subjects.

STANDARD

Correctional Peace Officers shall be knowledgeable and proficient of their Division approved policies and procedures for the safe applications of the various types of restraint gear and retention devices (e.g. safety triangle).

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

  1. Application of Restraint Gear – The Correctional Peace Officer shall be knowledgeable and proficient in the ability to apply and remove restraint gear to both a passive and resistive subject and make the determination as to when force is being applied during the process, as well as associated documentation. Correctional Peace Officers will be trained in the application of mechanical restraints on inmates with physical disabilities.
  2. Problem Solving/Decision-Making –The Correctional Peace Officer shall be knowledgeable and proficient in analyzing situations and recognizing non-verbal cues to determine the appropriate course of action during the application of restraint gear.
  3. Officer Safety – The Correctional Peace Officer shall demonstrate situational and tactical awareness and appropriate response.
  4. Communication – The Correctional Peace Officer shall use verbal and non-verbal skills to provide appropriate instruction to each, inmate, youth, parolee, and/or suspect. The Correctional Peace Officer shall document any use of force.
  5. Ethics – The Correctional Peace Officer shall abide by the code of ethics and accepted principles of conduct that govern decisions and actions based on professional values and expectations.
  6. Stress Tolerance and Emotional Regulation – The Correctional Peace Officer shall maintain self-control and make timely, rational decisions in the application of restraint gear.
  7. Restricted Access Points – The Correctional Peace Officer assigned to an institution or facility will learn the application of restraint gear techniques for restricted access points (i.e. cell food ports) as well as the use of retention devices.
  8. As local procedures may vary between jurisdictions, the basic academies will teach “Departmental Standards” techniques for restraint gear.

CITATIONS

  • DOM 52050.10 Restraint Gear
  • DOM 52050.10.1 Restraint Gear – Handcuffs/Handcuff Keys
  • DOM 52050.10.2 All Restraint Gear
  • DOM 52050.10.3 Restraint Gear Use
  • DOM 52050.12 Application
  • DOM 86010.11 Parole Agent Arming
  • California Law, Penal Code, Section 832.4
  • California Code of Regulations, Title 15, Section 3268 & 3268.2, Use of Force, Restraining
  • California Correctional Health Care Services “Application of Mechanical Restraints for Inmate-Patients with Medical Necessity for Special Cuffing” Memorandum August 25, 2015
GS007 - USE OF AUTHORITY

USE OF AUTHORITY STANDARD
GS007

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

The primary mission of Correctional Peace Officers is to provide public safety through safe and secure incarceration of offenders, effective parole supervision, and rehabilitative strategies to successfully reintegrate offenders into our communities. 

Inherent to this authority of public protection, either by means of maintaining security within an institution or active supervision of offenders in society, a Correctional Peace Officer must stay vigilant of potential or developing situations, taking steps to prevent or resolve such conflicts with minimal reliance on the use of force.   This is accomplished by being constantly aware of their surroundings, exercising safe practices, applying discretion and ethical decision making in all courses of action,  and communicating  effectively with persons of all backgrounds.  Some situations will require the use of force to maintain or restore order and security or for the protection of themselves or others. This force must be used in compliance with the laws and policies governing the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR).  Each Correctional Peace Officer must have the knowledge of how and when to use force, as well as the skill and ability to effectively utilize force.  Only a well-trained Correctional Peace Officer can perform at this level.

STANDARD

All Correctional Peace Officers shall be trained and knowledgeable in CDCR Policy and Procedure as it relates to their authority level in performing their duties.  They must be trained and knowledgeable in effective communication while carrying themselves professionally. They must have the knowledge, skills and abilities to recognize developing situations and apply communication and de-escalation techniques in resolving those matters without force when possible. They must have the knowledge, skills and abilities to use force, within their authority, should the situation call for it.  

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

Correctional Peace Officers shall be trained in:

  • Ethical decision making
  • Situational awareness
  • Effective communication and de-escalation techniques
  • The Knowledge, Skills and Abilities of the use of force available to their job classification in the performance of their duties.
  • Self-defense and the defense of others

CITATIONS

  • Penal Code 830.2 and 830.5
  • California Code of Regulations, Title 15, 3291. Employee Peace Officer and Law Enforcement Personnel.
  • California Code of Regulations, Title 15, 3268, Use of Force
  • CPOST Standard for Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (GS001)
  • CPOST Standard for Core Subjects (GS002)
  • CPOST Standard for Use of Force (CO002, PA001)
GS008 - COMMUNICATION

COMMUNICATION STANDARD
GS008

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

An important responsibility of Correctional Peace Officers is their ability to effectively communicate in the correctional and public environment.  Effective communication applies to all aspects of the working environment and across all manner of communication (i.e. verbal, non-verbal, and written). A Correctional Peace Officer must be able to convey lawful orders, give clear and concise directions, display confidence and authority, while effectively communicating in the work setting with staff, the public, and offenders.

Correctional Peace Officers can promote effective communication in the working environment by understanding their role and responsibilities as they pertain to their treatment of people, by applying discretion and ethical decision making in all courses of action, and communicating effectively with persons of all backgrounds. They must be able to recognize dangerous situations, take steps to defuse the volatility, and maintain order in their assigned areas of responsibility. This is accomplished by maintaining correctional awareness and using effective communication and interpersonal skills to de-escalate potentially violent situations, to exercise ethical decision making to minimize the use of force. They must follow and guide others in using established health and safety protocols, while promoting a strong and positive example for staff, the public and offenders. Only a well-trained Correctional Peace Officer can perform at this level.

STANDARD

Correctional Peace Officers will have the Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities to effectively communicate and perform their duties efficiently and safely within the correctional and public environment.  They will receive training and demonstrate proficiency in all aspects of effective communication, including: situational awareness, stress management, personal protection, ethical decision making, and understanding verbal, non-verbal and written communication in the proper use of their authority.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

Correctional Peace Officers shall be trained in:

  • Body Language/visual cues/non-verbal communication
  • Strategic communication (deliberate)
  • Effective communication
  • De-escalation techniques
  • Report writing
  • Offender/Staff interaction
  • Active Listening Techniques
  • Empathy
  • Dealing with a diverse population
  • Maintaining professional behavior and leadership among Staff, Offenders, and the public
  • Safety Standard
  • Use of Authority Standard
  • Ethics Standard
  • Adaptive support techniques (as applicable)
  • Crisis (emergency) communication

CITATIONS

  • Penal Code 830.2 and 830.5
  • California Code of Regulations, Title 15:
    1. 3000 Effective Communication
    2. 3268 Use of Force
    3. 3270 General Policy
    4. 3278 Control of Inmates and Parolees
    5. 3291 Employee Peace Officer and Law Enforcement Personnel
    6. 3391 Employee Conduct
    7. 3430 General Policy (Article 4, General Personnel Regulations)
  • CPOST Standard for Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (GS001)
  • CPOST Standard for Core Subjects (GS002)
GS009 - ETHICS TRAINING

ETHICS TRAINING STANDARD
GS009

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

CPOST Standard for Core Subjects (GS002)

BACKGROUND

Ethical behavior and decision making is a fundamental principal of behavior for the Correctional Peace Officer. Training Correctional Peace Officers in ethical behavior and decision making will support Departmental values, protect against civil litigation, as well as promote public trust.  Ethics instruction shall be embedded throughout departmental training as applicable.

STANDARD

All Correctional Peace Officers shall be trained and knowledgeable in California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) Policy and Procedure as it relates to ethical behavior and decision making.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

  1. Problem Solving/Decision Making – Correctional Peace Officers shall be trained and knowledgeable in assessing situations to determine a reasonable course of action.
  2. Communication – Correctional Peace Officers shall learn effective verbal, non-verbal, and written skills in accordance with CDCR Policy.
  3. Authority – Correctional Peace Officers shall abide by the Department’s Code of Ethics and Oath of Office as accepted principles of conduct that govern decisions and actions.

CITATIONS

  • California Code of Regulations (CCR), Title 15, Article 2-Employees, Section 3391-Employee Conduct
  • The City of New York Commission to Investigate Allegations of Police Corruption
  • Anti-Corruption Procedures of the Police Department Commission Report, Milton Mollen 1994
  • CDCR Code of Ethics/Oath of Office
  • PC832 – Learning Domain 1
  • DOM 33030.3.3 – Law Enforcement Code of Ethics
GS010 - SAFETY

SAFETY STANDARD
GS010

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

The responsibility of Correctional Peace Officers is the protection of the public from crime and victimization. Correctional Peace Officers in the institutional setting are responsible for maintaining the safety and security of all staff and offenders under their supervision. Correctional Peace Officers in the public setting are vested with the responsibility to protect and ensure the public’s safety and that of parolees in their charge by maintaining effective supervision. 

Correctional Peace Officers can promote a safe working environment by being constantly aware of their surroundings, applying discretion and ethical decision making in all courses of action, and communicating effectively with persons of all backgrounds. They must be able to recognize dangerous situations and take steps to maintain order in their assigned areas of responsibility. This is accomplished by supporting rehabilitation efforts, de-escalating potentially violent situations, or if the situation dictates, using force appropriately. They must follow and guide others in using established health and safety protocols. Only a well-trained Correctional Peace Officer can perform at this level.

STANDARD

Correctional Peace Officers shall have the Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities to perform their duties as safely as possible within the public and correctional environment.  They will receive training and demonstrate proficiency in all aspects of personal and public safety, including: situational awareness, stress management, personal protection, ethical decision making, effective communication and the proper use of their authority.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

Correctional Peace Officers shall be trained in:

  • Stress Management and personal wellness
  • Established protocols for protection from blood borne and airborne infectious diseases
  • The proper use of safety equipment
  • Self-defense and the defense of others
  • Situational awareness
  • Arrest and control of subjects
  • Emergency response
  • Controlled use of force
  • Problem solving/Ethical decision making
  • Effective communication

CITATIONS

  • Penal Code 830.2 and 830.5
  • California Code of Regulations, Title 15;
    1. 3268 Use of Force
    2. 2 Use of Restraints
    3. 3270 General Policy (Article 2, Security)
    4. 3276 Firearms
    5. 3278 Control of Inmates and Parolees
    6. 3291 Employee Peace Officer and Law Enforcement Personnel
    7. 3300 Prevention of Disorders
    8. 3430 General Policy (Article 4, General Personnel Regulations)
  • CPOST Standard for Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (GS001)
  • CPOST Standard for Core Subjects (GS002)
  • CPOST Standard for Ethics (GS009)
  • CPOST Standard for Communication (GS010)
  • PC832
GS011 - FEMALE OFFENDERS

FEMALE OFFENDERS STANDARD
GS011

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) established the office of Female Offender Programs and Services (FOPS) in July 2005, within the Division of Adult Institutions.  FOPS mission is to provide female offenders with gender-responsive supervision, treatment and services that increase opportunities for successful reintegration into their communities while reducing the number of females incarcerated in California. FOPS is devoted to addressing female offenders’ rehabilitative needs, utilizing programs and services set forth by Penal Code 3430.

STANDARD

All Correctional Peace Officers shall be trained in the operational procedures and policies as they relate to working with female offenders. Correctional Peace Officers shall have an understanding of what gender responsive means when working with Female Offenders and understand the types of rehabilitative programs that are provided for female offenders.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

Correctional Peace Officers shall be trained in:

Problem Solving/Decision-Making – Correctional Peace Officers shall be knowledgeable and proficient in analyzing situations to solve problems that may arise in the course of supervising female offenders to include gender specific behavioral needs.

Communication – Correctional Peace Officers shall use effective verbal and non-verbal skills to convey intended meaning and establish understanding while remaining aware of gender specific communication needs as appropriate. The Correctional Peace Officer shall also be proficient with the ability to document activity as it relates to management of female offenders.

Ethics – Correctional Peace Officers shall be knowledgeable and proficient in the ability to exercise the duties as a Correctional Peace Officer in accordance with appropriate policies and procedures as it relates to female offenders to include appropriate conduct, gender responsive training, and overfamiliarity.

CITATIONS

GS012 - MENTAL HEALTH

MENTAL HEALTH STANDARD
GS012

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

California Penal Code 13601(a)(3):  When developing, approving, and monitoring the standards for training of state correctional peace officer apprentices, the CPOST shall consider including additional training in the areas of mental health and rehabilitation, as well as coursework on the theory and history of corrections.

BACKGROUND

In the case of Coleman, et al v. Brown, et al, (1995) the Court directed California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) to provide mental health services training for all personnel having regular contact with inmates and parolees.

CDCR will provide a broad range of mental health services to inmates and parolees by assessing the needs of its population and developing specialized programs of mental health care, to the extent resources are available for this purpose. Necessary and appropriate mental health services will be provided to inmates and parolees, and adequate staff and facilities will be maintained for the delivery of such services (Title 15 (3360) (a).

CDCR shall receive, evaluate, house, treat, and/or refer all inmates who, by virtue of their mental illness, are unable to appropriately function within the constraints of the usual correctional processing or program assignments (DOM 91020.1) Additionally, the Department will provide for the detection, diagnosis, treatment, and referral of inmates and parolees with mental health problems and to assist each facility’s Warden during all stages of each inmate’s period of incarceration (DOM 91020.2).

STANDARD

Correctional Peace Officers shall be knowledgeable of the available mental health programs and services for inmates and parolees within CDCR, and the essential role and positive impact that mental health intervention may have on the rehabilitation of inmates and the safety and security of our prisons. Additionally, Correctional Peace Officers shall: understand and act in accordance with their authority and responsibility, be able to use effective communication, and make ethical and safe decisions while working with mentally ill inmates and parolees. 

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

  1. Correctional Peace Officers will be provided training on the knowledge, skills and abilities to maintain the safety and security of all parties while working with inmates and parolees with mental health conditions.
  2. Correctional Peace Officers shall understand their authority and responsibility, and the importance of custody and clinical staff teamwork to ensure proper handling, reporting, and timely referral of inmates perceived as experiencing a mental health crisis.
  3. Correctional Peace Officers shall demonstrate situational and tactical awareness and the ability to respond to inmates who are experiencing a mental health crisis.
  4. Correctional Peace Officers shall use effective communication skills to try to convey intended meaning and establish understanding with mentally ill inmates in order to de-escalate crisis situations.
  5. Correctional Peace Officers shall abide by the accepted principles of conduct that govern decisions and actions with regard to inmates who have mental health issues (confidentiality, urgency, use of force, etc.)

CITATIONS

  • California Penal Code 13601(a)(1)(3)
  • CDCR Department Operations Manual (DOM) 91020.1, 2
  • Coleman, et al v. Brown, et al (1995)
  • California Code of Regulations, Title 15:
    3360, Availability of Mental Health Services
  • CPOST Standard for Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (GS001)
  • Code of Conduct
  • CPOST Ethics Standard (GS009)
GS013 - REPORT WRITING

REPORT WRITING STANDARD
GS013

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

Report Writing is an integral part of a Correctional Peace Officer’s daily duties. Documentation and reports are used to record offender behavior, incidents, institutional operations, correspondence, and provide information to peers and management. Equally important, are disciplinary documents (RVR’s, Counseling Chronos) which are used to memorialize offender behavior as part of the documentation process linked to credit earning and violations.  A proficiency and ability to effectively communicate orally and in writing are important elements in performing the duties of a Correctional Peace Officer successfully.

A Correctional Peace Officer must be able to proficiently  write a report using report writing standards:

  • Independently compose a thorough, accurate and legible report.
  • Write a report documenting a sequence of events.
  • Prepare correspondence, inter-departmental memos, and other administrative paperwork (logbooks, unit records) not specifically related to offenders.
  • Use proper punctuation and abbreviations.
  • Write progressive discipline/informational reports.
  • Write Rules Violation Reports (Parole Violation Reports).
  • Write incident reports
  • Write reports with the understanding that the report may be used in court proceedings.
  • Use of electronic documentation platforms (SOMS, ERMS).

STANDARD

Correctional Peace Officers shall receive training in report writing and departmental reports and documentation requirements related to their mission and operations. 

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

Knowledge:

Correctional Peace Officers shall understand the purpose, utility, and importance of writing accurate reports.  They shall understand that their written report may be used as the primary source document in legal proceedings and is considered a permanent legal document. Report writing is an essential function for all Correctional Peace Officers. The training shall be tailored to capture current departmental policy. Providing accurate and factual information minimizes the risk of liability to the Department and the Correctional Peace Officer. Correctional Peace Officers must be aware that written reports can be confidential and require professional discretion, given the sensitive nature of the correspondence or risk to parties. All reports become part of the evidentiary chain and therefore must be accurate, factual, and truthful (legally defensible).

 

Skills and Abilities

Written reports shall document relevant factual evidence of first-hand observations (including sights, sounds, smells, chronological series of events, etc.) and actions. Written reports shall be legible and use correct grammar and spelling.

 Correctional Peace Officers must be observant of their surroundings and understand the importance of timely writing clear, concise, complete, and accurate reports within departmental rules, regulations, and policy.  

CITATIONS

  • POST Learning domain #18 “Investigative Report Writing”
  • CDCR Forms: 128, 115, 602 (Inmate/Parolee Appeal), 837(Crime/Incident Report)
  • CCR Title 15, Section 3321: Confidential Material
  • CCR Title 15, Section 3314 (a)(3): Rule Violation Report
  • DOM Section 51020.17.1: Staff Reporting Requirements
  • CCR Title 15, Section 33268: Use of Force
  • CCR Title 15, Section 3314: Administrative Rule Violations
  • CCR Title 15, Section 3315: Serious Rule Violations
  • CCR Title 15, Section 3323: Disciplinary Credit Forfeiture Schedule
  • California PC, Part 1, Title 7, Chapter 5, Section 118.1: Perjury and Subornation of Perjury
GS014 - SCENARIO BASED TRAINING

SCENARIO BASED TRAINING STANDARD (SBT)
GS014

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of CDCR correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

CPOST General Standard GS001 – Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSA) requires all Correctional Peace Officers will be trained in the KSAs necessary to effectively perform their scope of duties. In part:

Abilities are the student’s ability to use both the Knowledge portion of the training along with the practiced Skills in the correct context and situation in scenario or a real life setting. 

Scenario Based Training (SBT) is industry recognized to be an extremely effective method of training peace officers to perform their scope of duties. It does so by combining previously learned Knowledge and Skills to correctly practice the Abilities portion of their training in a safe environment. An SBT environment allows for mistakes to be made and behavior corrected prior to job assignment.

STANDARD

SBT is defined as a formal training using scripted exercises with role playing designed to teach measurable objectives by placing the student in a structured situation that simulates the work environment as much as practical, while maintaining strict safety guidelines. 

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

For SBT to be successful it must:

  1. Keep student/instructor safety paramount
  2. All SBT shall be provided by an instructor(s) certified in the course being taught and follow safety protocols developed for subject specific trainings
  3. Build upon and apply previously learned Knowledge and Skills
  4. Simulate real life situations as much as practical within safety guidelines
  5. Teach measurable objectives
  6. Be scripted with branching alternative response possibilities
  7. Be completely controlled at all times by trained SBT instructors
  8. Measure performance outcomes

CITATIONS

  • CPOST Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSA) Standard GS001
  • Alarm Response Instructor’s Handbook
  • OCS Annual Training Plan
  • CTT (BCOA)
  • CRT Training Plan
  • DJJ Training Plan
  • DAI/IST Annual Training Plan
  • DAPO Annual Training Plan
GS015 - CRITICAL ELEMENTS OF EFFECTIVE TRAINING

CRITICAL ELEMENTS OF EFFECTIVE TRAINING STANDARD
GS015

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

Effective training is not a haphazard process but instead a designed, focused written process of combining necessary critical elements to train to expected outcomes. Training is given for many reasons including; providing general information, upward mobility, career-related, job-related and job-required. Job-Required training as defined in DOM 32010.4, is designed to establish adequate performance in a current assignment.  Therefore, because the correctional peace officer attending Job-Related training will be held to the prescribed standards of that training, the training must meet specified methodology.  In order for CPOST to determine if job-related training is well designed and effective, critical elements must be present in lesson plan design as well as the lesson delivery. 

STANDARD

Job-Required and Job-Related training for Correctional Peace Officers is designed to ensure minimum competency and increase employee performance. These types of training shall include specific standards of both design and delivery.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

The Critical Elements to achieve effective Job-Required/Job-Related training are:

  1. The training outlines objectives, instructional material, teaching aids, measurement tools and the instructor(s) roles.
  2. A clear statement of an expected outcome once the training has been completed.
  3. The lesson contains clear, achievable Learning Objectives that support the expected outcome.
  4. The training is relevant to the correctional peace officer’s authority and job assignment.
  5. The training is provided by a qualified, competent, certified (as applicable), and prepared instructor(s).
  6. The format(s)/platform and instructional methodology used to deliver the training supports the expected outcome.
  7. The training venue or facility supports the formats of the training and the expected outcome.
  8. The sequence of the training progresses from initial to advanced lessons.
  9. The allotted time for the training provides for sufficient interaction between instructor and student based on ratios, including questions, discussions, demonstrations, and practice.
  10. There is sufficient time allotted to support the instructional methodology of the training as designed and to reach the expected outcome.
  11. The props, written materials, visual aids, and other resources are necessary and effective to support and reinforce the objective(s).
  12. There is a validation process to determine the effectiveness of the training and to determine if the expected outcome has been met.
  13. Process for student feedback. There is a process for student feedback that provides for the student’s perspective of the effectiveness of the training.
  14. Lesson plan or training materials include input from qualified, competent Subject Matter Expert(s) (SMEs)

CITATIONS

  • California Penal Code 13601(a)(1)
  • DOM 32010.4 California State Training Program
  • CPOST General Training Standard GS001 – KSA Standards
  • CPOST General Training Standard GS002 – Core Subjects
GS016 - REFRESHER TRAINING

REFRESHER TRAINING STANDARD
GS016

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of CDCR correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

In order to maintain proficiency and competence in the performance of correctional peace officer duties, “refresher training” must be relied upon to reinforce perishable knowledge, skills, and abilities, as well as update existing policy and procedures. Refresher training ensures the safe, competent, and successful performance of correctional peace officers on the job. Refresher training may also serve as On-the-Job training (OJT) to reinforce topics or skills. Refresher training must fall within the essential functions of the correctional peace officer classification, reinforcing those skills and elements essential for competent job performance. Refresher training may be Job–Related or Job-Required as specified in DOM, Article 18, General Training, section 32010.4.

STANDARD

Refresher training is defined as a training delivered by a supervisor or instructor, online or as OJT, to facilitate, reinforce, and enhance the knowledge, skills and abilities of previously delivered training for correctional peace officers. This training should summarize or build upon existing policies, procedures, skills and abilities to ensure safe and competent job performance.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD (KSA and Authority, Communication)

For refresher training to be successful it must:

  1. Be provided by an instructor(s) certified in the course/topic (as applicable) or via an e-Learning module.
  2. Build upon or reinforce/enhance previous knowledge, skills or abilities
  3. Maintain measurable objectives
  4. To be reviewed on a(n) (annual, bi-annual, etc.) basis

Refresher training must also adhere to the critical elements for excellent training (General Standard 015) which requires:

  1. A clear statement of an expected outcome once the training has been completed.
  2. The training is relevant and within the job scope of the students.
  3. The training is provided by a competent and prepared instructor.
  4. The format(s) used in the training supports the training and the expected outcome.
  5. The venue of the training supports the formats of the training and the expected outcome.
  6. The sequence of the training flows from initial, immediate, and advanced lessons.
  7. The training provides for sufficient interaction between instructor and student including questions, discussions, demonstrations, and practice.
  8. There is sufficient time allotted to support the training as designed and to reach the expected outcome.
  9. The props, written materials, visual aids, and other support materials are effective.
  10. There is a validation process to determine the effectiveness of the training and to determine if the expected outcome has been met.

CITATIONS

  • CPOST Knowledge, Skill and Abilities (KSA) Standard GS 001
  • On-The-Job (OJT) Standard GS 003
  • Critical Elements for Excellent Training (General Standard XXX)
  • Off Post training Schedule
  • DOM Article 18, General Training, section 32010.1
GS017 - REMOTE LEARNING

REMOTE LEARNING / TRAINING STANDARD
GS017
 

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of CDCR correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

Remote Learning is defined as training that occurs when the student and the instructor are in separate physical locations and the information is relayed through technology.

Proficiency and competence in the performance of correctional peace officer duties are integral to reinforcing knowledge, skills, and abilities, as well as updates to existing policy and procedures, and are maintained by on-going training programs. Although training is often presented in a setting where the instructor and student are in the same location, technology enables the opportunity to provide Remote Learning when appropriate. The expected outcome of the training is key to determining if the training may be accomplished using Remote Learning. 

STANDARD

Remote Learning may be used to facilitate training if the technology used supports the training and expected outcome, and both the instructor and the student have been trained in the use of and have access to the necessary technology. 

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD 

For Remote Learning to be successful, the instructor and students must be trained in the competent operation of the technologies being used, as well as having the necessary equipment. All Remote Learning Training shall be tracked using CDCR Form-844 or other Departmentally approved documentation.

Remote Learning must also adhere to the Critical Elements of Effective Training (General Standard 015).

CITATIONS

  • CPOST Knowledge, Skills and Abilities (KSA) Standard (General Standard 001)
  • On-the-Job (OJT) Standard (General Standard 003)
  • Critical Elements for Effective Training Standard (General Standard 015)
  • Refresher Training Standard (General Standard 016)
  • Off Post Training Schedule
  • DOM Article 18, General Training, Section 32010.1
CO001 - EXPANDABLE BATON

EXPANDABLE BATON STANDARD
CO001

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

Correctional Peace Officers are required to carry expandable batons while on duty and are authorized to use them in an emergency or during a controlled Use of Force (UOF). Only weapons that have been approved by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) will be issued or assigned and carried and used while on duty, per California Code of Regulations Title 15, Section 3275(a).

An Expandable Baton (EB) is an approved weapon for carry and use while on duty.

The Expandable Baton (EB) may be used with reasonable force to subdue an attacker, overcome resistance, effect custody, or gain compliance with a lawful order.

STANDARD

Correctional Peace Officers shall have the knowledge, ability and basic skill in the proper care, storage, use, and retention of the Expandable Baton in order to maintain the safety and security of all persons.  

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

  1. Expandable Baton – The student shall be knowledgeable and proficient in the ability to perform all of the instructed movements related to the EB.
  2. Problem Solving/Decision-Making – The student shall be knowledgeable and proficient in analyzing situations and determining whether it is appropriate to deploy and use the EB and relevant techniques.
  3. Officer Safety – The student shall demonstrate situational and tactical awareness and the ability to respond appropriately to ensure officer safety as well as safety and security of those around the officer.
  4. Communication – The student shall use effective verbal and non-verbal skills when deploying the EB. The student shall document and report any use of force. Correctional Peace Officers shall also be adequately trained in how to document incidents where the Correctional Peace Officer used the EB while on duty.
  5. Ethics – The student shall abide by the code of ethics and accepted principles of conduct that govern decisions and actions based on professional values and expectations.
  6. Stress Tolerance and Emotional Regulation – The student shall maintain self-control and make timely, reasonable decisions in the use of the EB. 
  7. The measurement of knowledge and proficiency in the above mentioned, components shall be delivered in pass/fail format.

CITATIONS

  • California Code of Regulations Title 15, Chapter 1-Rules and Regulations of Adult Operations and Program, Subchapter 4-General Institution Regulations, Article 1.5-Use of Force and Restraining Devices, Section 3268-Use of Force; Article 2-Security, Section 3275-Weapons, and Section 3278-Control of Inmates and Parolees
  • California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Department Operations Manual (DOM), Chapter 3-Personnel, Training and Employee Relations, Article 18-General Training, Section 32010.19.11-Less Lethal Weapons; Chapter 5-Adult Custody and Security Operations, Article 2-Use of Force, Sections 51020.1- 51020.5
  • California Penal Code, Sections 832 and 835
  • Monadnock expandable baton corporate website, www.batons.com, accessed December 2014
  • CPOST General Training Standard GS001
CO002 - USE OF FORCE

USE OF FORCE STANDARD
CO002

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

Correctional Peace Officers must be knowledgeable about California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s (CDCR) Departmental Use of Force (UOF) policy, and relevant laws. The goal is to create an atmosphere within CDCR where staff operates with minimal reliance on the use of force. Reasonable force will be used by staff when necessary to maintain the security of institutions and safety of offenders and staff. The law and policy dictates what force can be used and the general conditions under which force can and cannot be used. All uses of force must be within the guidelines of law and policy.

STANDARD

Correctional Peace Officers shall receive comprehensive training in all aspects of the departmental use of force policy that is authorized within their scope of authority.

Basic academies will provide extensive training as to the laws and regulations governing the use of force as well as developing skill sets for force options and the practical application of those optionsIn addition, basic academies will provide extensive training in the recognition of potentially dangerous situations and the use of de-escalation techniques to minimize the reliance on the use of force.

Correctional Peace Officers will receive annual use of force training.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

  1. Application of Force – The Correctional Peace Officer shall be proficient in the ability to apply reasonable force options in given circumstances and the appropriate documentation of those force options.
  2. Problem Solving/Decision-Making (Authority) –The Correctional Peace Officer shall be knowledgeable and take appropriate authority, based on the types of threats, including describing imminent and potential, and be proficient in analyzing situations and making objectively reasonable decisions about the appropriate action to take based upon the totality of the circumstances.
  3. Officer Safety – Correctional Peace Officers shall recognize their authority to take reasonable steps to protect themselves and others, as per CDCR policy and regulations
  4. Communication – The Correctional Peace Officer will be knowledgeable and  proficient/competent in the use of effective verbal and non-verbal communication techniques in order to de-escalate potential threats before they become imminent, with minimal reliance on the use of force
  5. Ethics – The Correctional Peace Officer shall abide by the code of ethics and accepted principles of conduct that govern decisions and actions based on professional values and expectations.

CITATIONS

  • California Code of Regulations Title 15, Article 1.5, Section 3268, Use of Force
  • Departmental Operations Manual Ch.5 Article 2, Policy 51021.1, Use of Force
  • State of California, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Department Operations Manual, Article 2, Use of Force, Sections 51020.1–51020.24
  • State of California, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Restricted Department Operations Manual, Section 55050.31
  • California Penal Code, Sections: 196-198, 832, 835a (1), (2), (3), (4), (5); PC835a (b), PC835a (c) (1) (a),(b); PC835a (d)
CO003 - ALARM RESPONSE

ALARM RESPONSE STANDARD
CO003

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of CDCR correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

The CDCR Alarm Response plan is a critical element in the overall security of an institution and the safety of staff and inmates.  It provides for an organized response to a medical or custodial emergency regardless of the scope of the emergency or the resources needed.  It is critical that all staff understand their role in performing this response.  Depending on the emergency, the response may involve a small number of staff or a complete suspension of operation and the involvement of all available staff. 

It is imperative that all staff receive annual training in this subject to maintain the safe operation of the facility.  Elements of Alarm Response may range from simple to complex requiring all responders to be well versed in their specific roles; as such, it is necessary to use the Scenario Based Training (SBT) format to effectively teach this subject.  SBT is the preferred industry standard format for teaching tactical and emergency training.

STANDARD

All correctional peace officers and supervisors shall complete Alarm Response Training, at least annually, using the Scenario Based Training (SBT) standard facilitated by certified Alarm Response instructors. 

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

Alarm Response training must incorporate the following:

  1. Keep student/instructor safety paramount
  2. All Alarm Response training shall be provided by a certified instructor(s) and follow established safety protocols
  3. Build upon and apply previously learned Knowledge and Skills
  4. Simulate real life situations as much as practical within safety guidelines
  5. Teach measurable objectives
  6. Be scripted with branching alternative response possibilities
  7. Be completely controlled at all times by trained Alarm Response instructors
  8. Measure performance outcomes

CITATIONS

  • CPOST Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSA) Standard GS001
  • California Code of Regulations, Title 15
  • DOM 32010.15 Officer, Sergeant, Lieutenant, CCI, Fire Chief, Fire Captain and MTA Required Annual Training
  • SBT Standard
  • DOM 55090 – Alarm Response
  • CDCR Office of Correctional Safety; Alarm Response Instructors Handbook
CO004 - NEW CORRECTIONAL OFFICER ORIENTATION/JOB SHADOWING

NEW CORRECTIONAL OFFICER ORIENTATION /JOB SHADOWING
STANDARD
CO004

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of CDCR correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

The Basic Correctional Officer Academy (BCOA) is necessary to equip newly appointed correctional peace officers with a thorough understanding of the laws, regulations, values, and culture of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). However, only through on-the-job experience do new correctional peace officers maximize their ability to perform competently in the challenging environment of our prisons.  Once graduated, new officers undergo a brief New Employee Orientation (NEO) and then are immediately assigned to a permanent assignment. Upon assignment and throughout the apprenticeship rotation, new officers undergo a trial and error process of learning their profession/job responsibilities which can result in unnecessary incidents and injuries, or an overwhelming feeling of incompetence until experience is gathered.  A Job Shadowing program initiated immediately upon arrival at the institution, can lead to a better understanding of local policies and procedures, reduce avoidable errors, and create a more confident, competent, and safe new officer.  

STANDARD

Upon graduation from the Academy, all newly appointed Correctional Officers shall be provided twenty (20) working days of training to include NEO and Job Shadowing assignments.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

The Job Shadowing training follows the period of institutional orientation wherein a new officer is rotated and assigned to various identified posts they will be likely working as part of their normal duties. Job Shadowing will allow the new officer to work alongside experienced officers who have knowledge and expertise regarding the post assignment and who can aid the new officer in learning how to perform all the related job duties/functions within institutional policies and procedures. During the Job Shadowing period the officer will not be posted/assigned to a position permanently, used to fill vacancies, or for overtime avoidance.

Job Shadowing training must incorporate the following:

  1. Learning the physical layout and egress points of the institution
  2. Understand the local missions, policies and procedures
  3. Understanding of each shift/watch
  4. Build upon and apply previously learned Knowledge, Skills and Abilities
  5. Observe the performance of job duties/functions and be afforded the opportunity to practice hands-on duties within established safety guidelines
  6. Promote on-the-job interactions and communication skills
  7. Promote correctional awareness and best practices

Each institution shall designate the posts/locations for job shadowing, including but not limited to:

  • Posts that are frequently vacant and filled by new officers (often difficult to work posts)
  • Posts with a history of new officer injury (i.e. Restricted Housing Units)
  • Posts that are complicated and have critical and complex security features to operate (i.e. Control Booths)
  • Logistically isolated one-officer posts with unique access points (i.e. Gates and Towers)
  • Familiarization of off-site post procedures (i.e. Hospital coverage, Transportation, Outside patrol)
  • Posts with frequent/direct inmate interaction including those with mental health/medical needs (i.e. EOP/DD Housing Units, Exercise Yard)
  • Posts that interact with other units and divisions (i.e. Medical, PIA, ISU)

Job Shadowing schedules will:

  • Reflect assignments of two to eight hours in length
  • Reflect job assignments for an individual officer
  • Be documented in Telestaff for tracking purposes

Following the successful completion of the (NEO) and Job Shadowing, the new Correctional Officer will be assigned to a post at the institution’s discretion.

CITATIONS

  • CPOST Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSA) Standard GS001
  • California Code of Regulations, Title 8 6022. Terms of Apprenticeship.
  • OJT Standard GS003
  • PC 13602
CC001 - CASEWORK PROCEDURES

CASEWORK PROCEDURES STANDARD
CC001

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

Efficient and effective application of the classification process relies on appropriate casework management.  Often times this requires organization and prioritization of numerous tasks to ensure deadlines are met.

STANDARD

Correctional Counselor I (CC I) shall have knowledge and understanding of correctional casework procedures, including Departmental systems and databases necessary to complete required casework functions.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

Effective casework management relies on appropriate and timely application of the classification process, which is essentially the completion of all classification related tasks and functions based upon an inmates case factors.  Examples of casework management include, but are not limited to: tracking and scheduling inmates for initial and annual reviews, preparing for and recording a committee action, processing marriage applications and correspondence requests, completing Post-Conviction Progress Reports, expeditiously correcting cases that have been returned to the assigned counselor for correction, etc.  Counselors must possess the ability to effectively utilize Departmental systems and databases necessary to complete required casework functions.

CITATIONS

  • DOM 61010.9 – Procedures – The Counselor
CC002 - CLASSIFICATION COMMITTEE

CLASSIFICATION COMMITTEE STANDARD
CC002

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

Classification is the study of the individual inmate for purposes of understanding his/her needs and providing an administrative procedure for carrying out a program for his/her adjustment, education, and skill assessment. The Department implemented policies to govern the classification process in order to comply with legal and departmental mandates. The Classification process plays a vital role in maintaining the safety and security of the institution, as the classification committee action affects an inmate’s program, housing, transfer, assignment, security level, custody, work group and privilege group. Proper classification reviews help to mitigate inmate appeals and litigation.

STANDARD

Correctional Counselors (CC I) shall be knowledgeable of the different types of Classification Committees and their purpose and functions as they relate to an inmate’s incarceration period.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

There are 6 different types of classification committees identified in CCR 3376:

  • Initial Classification Committee
  • Unit Classification Committee
  • Camp Classification Committee
  • Security Threat Group (STG) UCC
  • Institution Classification Committee
  • Departmental Review Board

CC I’s shall analyze case information; prepare recommendations and present to the classification committee case information and recommendations for modifications to, changes to or the confirmation of an inmate’s program. CC I’s will gather, read, verify, evaluate and summarize orally and/or in writing information from a variety of sources, reports, and evaluations to assist in the initial classification, reclassification or programming review of an inmate, i.e., central file, offense history, background, probation reports, court documents, abstracts of judgement, diagnostic evaluations, etc.

CITATIONS

  • DOM9 – Procedures – The Counselor
  • CCR Article 10 Classification Process 3375
  • CCR Article 10 Classification Committee 3376

 

CC003 - RECEPTION CENTER PROCESSING

RECEPTION CENTER PROCESSING STANDARD
CC003

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

Classification is the study of the individual inmate for purposes of understanding his/her needs and providing an administrative procedure for carrying out a program for his/her adjustment, education, and skill assessment. Upon identification and evaluation of an inmate’s needs, Counseling staff prepare a comprehensive written summary containing recommendations for an inmate’s program assignment and placement in a correctional setting.

STANDARD

Correctional Counselor I (CC I’s) shall be knowledgeable in the Reception Center (RC) process, ensuring appropriate documentation is included within the Institutional Staff Recommendation Summary (ISRS), Reception Center Readmission Summary (RCRS), and Classification Scoresheets which are all key components of RC processing.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

During RC processing, critical case factors and pertinent information identified in an inmate’s Electronic Records Management System (ERMS) file is entered into various sections of their Strategic Offender Management System (SOMS) file.  Information from both systems is used to identify inmate case factors for determination of appropriate classification and program placement.  Other information to be reviewed includes, but is not limited to: the Probation Officer’s Report, archive file(s), the California Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (CLETS), and medical/mental health information.

CITATIONS

  • DOM 61010.9 – Procedures – The Counselor
  • CCR Article 10 Classification Process 3375
  • CCR Article 10 Classification Committee 3376
  • MOU (eff. 7/3/15-7/2/18) Article XX Correctional Counselor Workload 20.02

 

CC004 - SAFETY AND SECURITY

SAFETY AND SECURITY STANDARD
CC004

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

Under the provisions of Penal Code Section 832, successful completion of a training course in laws of arrest, search and seizure, and in firearms and chemical agents is a requirement for permanent status as a Peace Officer working in the classification of a Correctional Counselor I (CCI). As CCIs are expected to perform peace officer duties as needed which include assisting custodial staff during emergency situations as well as maintaining order when necessary, it is essential they receive initial and on-going training in emergency response procedures and custodial equipment they are authorized to carry.

STANDARD

CC I’s will receive initial and annual training in emergency response procedures. They will be trained and qualified on custodial equipment they have been authorized to use as well as completing annual refresher and qualification training in those subjects.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

In the course of their duties, CC I’s are required to respond to emergencies or disturbances occurring within their facility. While on duty, CC I’s shall be required to use mandated safety equipment subject to local operational procedures, which may include a form of less lethal force (pepper spray and/or expandable baton). At times, CC I’s may be utilized as a secondary response team to assist in the restraint, escorting and searching of inmates. CC I’s shall be able to respond effectively to emergency situations.

CITATIONS

  • PC 832 Training
  • DOM 32010.13 Probationary Employees, Correctional Counselors
  • DOM 32010.15 Officer, Sergeant, Lieutenant, CCI, Fire Chief, Fire Captain and MTA Required Annual Training
  • DOM 32010.19.1 Weapons Qualification
  • DOM 32010.19.3 Weapons Requalification Requirements DOM 51010.3 Peace Officer Authority
  • DOM 51020.15 Chemical Agents
  • CCR Subchapter 4, General Institution Regulations
    • Article 2 Security General Policy 3270
    • Article 2 Responsibility of Employees 3271
CC005 - WORKING WITH INMATES/REHABILITATION

WORKING WITH INMATES / REHABILITATION STANDARD
CC005

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

Under general supervision, Correctional Counselor I (CC I’s) assemble, organize, analyze, and record information necessary for classification and parole planning for inmates; interview, counsel, and assist inmates with their adjustment and development or modification of their program in a correctional setting; perform peace officer duties as required, and replace and/or assist custodial staff during emergency situations, such as fights, attempted escapes, or major incidents, such as riots;  maintain order and supervise the conduct of inmates to ensure safety of persons and property; and complete other related duties.

STANDARD

CC I’s, within the scope of their duties, should be available to inmates on a regular basis.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

CC I’s individually counsel inmates to assist in their adjustment to incarceration. These non-clinical interactions include, but are not limited to: providing leadership for inmates; identifying individualized inmate programming needs and availability; as well as clarifying institutional and Departmental policies, procedures, rules, and regulations that impact an inmate’s incarceration period.

CITATIONS

  • DOM 61010.9 – Procedures – The Counselor
  • CCR Subchapter 4, General Institution Regulations:
    • Article 2 Security General Policy 3270
    • Article 2 Responsibility of Employees 3271
    • Article 10 Classification Process 3375
    • Article 10 Classification Committee 3376 Subchapter 5, Personnel:
    • Article 2 Employee Conduct 3391
    • Article 2 Familiarity 3400
    • Article 2 Employee and Inmate/Parolee Relations 3401
    • Article 2 Central Files 3402
    • Article 2 Legal Assistance to Inmates and Parolees 3405
  • MOU (eff. 7/3/15-7/2/18) Article XX Correctional Counselor Workload 20.02
CC006 - WRITTEN AND ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

WRITTEN AND ORAL COMMUNICATIONS STANDARD
CC006

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

Correctional counselors regularly interact with inmates during non-clinical counseling and interview sessions, as well as provide written and verbal responses to inmate requests and complaints.  Additionally, they complete a variety of written documents and forms, including but not limited to, recommendation reports and classification committee chronos.

STANDARD

Correctional Counselor I (CC I’s) shall utilize oral and written language to communicate effectively with inmates, staff, other agencies, and the public.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

CC I’s will be tasked with responding to written and verbal inmates’ requests on a daily basis. In addition, CC I’s are required to record committee actions, complete post-conviction progress reports, prepare correspondences, inter-departmental memorandums, and other administrative paperwork. CC I’s act as a liaison for family members, public agencies, attorneys and others needing casework information while representing the Department.

CITATIONS

  • DOM 61010.4 – Social History/Staff Reports
  • DOM 61010.9 – Procedures – The Counselor
CC007 - ALARM RESPONSE

ALARM RESPONSE STANDARD
CC007

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of CDCR correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

The CDCR Alarm Response plan is a critical element in the overall security of an institution and the safety of staff and inmates.  It provides for an organized response to a medical or custodial emergency regardless of the scope of the emergency or the resources needed.  It is critical that all staff understand their role in performing this response.  Depending on the emergency, the response may involve a small number of staff or a complete suspension of operation and the involvement of all available staff. 

It is imperative that all staff receive annual training in this subject to maintain the safe operation of the facility.  Elements of Alarm Response may range from simple to complex requiring all responders to be well versed in their specific roles; as such, it is necessary to use the Scenario Based Training (SBT) format to effectively teach this subject.  SBT is the preferred industry standard format for teaching tactical and emergency training.

STANDARD

All correctional peace officers and supervisors shall complete Alarm Response Training, at least annually, using the Scenario Based Training (SBT) standard facilitated by certified Alarm Response instructors. 

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

Alarm Response training must incorporate the following:

  1. Keep student/instructor safety paramount
  2. All Alarm Response training shall be provided by a certified instructor(s) and follow established safety protocols
  3. Build upon and apply previously learned Knowledge and Skills
  4. Simulate real life situations as much as practical within safety guidelines
  5. Teach measurable objectives
  6. Be scripted with branching alternative response possibilities
  7. Be completely controlled at all times by trained Alarm Response instructors
  8. Measure performance outcomes

CITATIONS

  • CPOST Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSA) Standard GS001
  • California Code of Regulations, Title 15
  • DOM 32010.15 Officer, Sergeant, Lieutenant, CCI, Fire Chief, Fire Captain and MTA Required Annual Training
  • SBT Standard
  • DOM 55090 – Alarm Response
  • CDCR Office of Correctional Safety; Alarm Response Instructors Handbook
PA001 - USE OF FORCE

USE OF FORCE STANDARD
PA001

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

Parole Agents (PAs) must be knowledgeable about the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s (CDCR) Departmental Use of Force (UOF) policy, and relevant laws. The goal is to create an atmosphere within CDCR where staff operates with minimal reliance on the use of force. Reasonable force will be used by staff when necessary to maintain the safety and security of all persons. The law and policy dictates what force can be used and the general conditions under which force can and cannot be used. All uses of force must be within the guidelines of law and policy.

STANDARD

PAs shall receive comprehensive training in all aspects of the departmental use of force policy that is authorized within their scope of authority.

Basic academies will provide extensive training as to the laws and regulations governing the use of force as well as developing skill sets for force options and the practical application of those options. In addition, basic academies will provide extensive training in the recognition of potentially dangerous situations and the use of de-escalation techniques to minimize the reliance of force options.

PAs will receive annual use of force training.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

  1. Application of Force – The PAs shall be proficient in the ability to apply objectively reasonable force options in given circumstances and the appropriate documentation of those force options.
  2. Problem Solving/Decision-Making –The PAs shall be proficient in analyzing situations and making reasonable decisions about the appropriate action to take based upon the totality of the circumstances.
  3. Peace Officer Safety – The PAs must be able to recognize situations where they have the authority to use reasonable force to effect arrest and custody, overcome resistance, and subdue an attacker to prevent escape or gain compliance with a lawful order as authorized by the California Penal Code. Deadly force may only be used upon another person when the PA reasonably believes, based on the totality of circumstances, that such force is necessary to defend against an imminent threat of death or great bodily injury to the officer or another person.
  4. Communication – The PAs will be knowledgeable of and demonstrate effective verbal and non-verbal communication PAs must understand that individuals with physical, mental, developmental or intellectual disabilities may affect and impair their ability to understand and/or comply with commands from peace officers. Where feasible, a PA shall, before the use of force, make reasonable efforts to identify themselves as a peace officer.
  5. Ethics – The PAs shall abide by the code of ethics and accepted principles of conduct that govern decisions and actions based applicable law and on professional values and expectations.

CITATIONS

  • California Code of Regulations Title 15, Article 1.5, Section 3268, Use of Force
  • State of California, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Restricted Department Operations Manual, Section 31
  • California Penal Code, Sections: 196-198, 832, 835
  • Assembly Bill 392
PA002 - EXPANDABLE BATON

EXPANDABLE BATON STANDARD
PA002

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

Parole Agents (PAs) are authorized to carry expandable batons (EB) while on duty and when necessary, to subdue an attacker, overcome resistance, effect custody, or gain compliance with a lawful order. Only weapons that have been approved by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) will be issued or assigned per California Code of Regulations Title 15, Section 3275(a).

STANDARD

PAs shall have the knowledge, ability and basic skill in the proper care, storage, use, and retention of the EB in order to maintain the safety and security of all persons.  

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

  1. Expandable Baton – The PA shall be knowledgeable and proficient in the ability to perform all of the instructed movements related to the EB.
  2. Problem Solving/Decision-Making – The PA shall be knowledgeable and proficient in analyzing situations and determining whether it is appropriate to deploy and use the EB and relevant techniques.
  3. Peace Officer Safety – The PA shall demonstrate situational and tactical awareness and the ability to respond appropriately to ensure agent safety as well as safety of all persons.
  4. Communication – The PA shall use effective verbal and non-verbal skills when deploying the EB. The PA shall document and report any use of force. PAs shall also be adequately trained in how to document incidents where the PA used the EB while on duty.
  5. Ethics – The PA shall abide by the code of ethics and accepted principles of conduct that govern decisions and actions based on professional values and expectations.
  6. Stress Tolerance and Emotional Regulation – The PA shall maintain self-control and make timely, reasonable decisions in the use of the EB.
  7. The measurement of knowledge and proficiency in the above mentioned, components shall be delivered in pass/fail format.

CITATIONS

  • California Code of Regulations Title 15, Chapter 1-Rules and Regulations of Adult Operations and Program, Subchapter 4-General Institution Regulations, Article 1.5-Use of Force and Restraining Devices, Section 3268-Use of Force; Article 2-Security, Section 3275-Weapons, and Section 3278-Control of Inmates and Parolees
  • California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Department Operations Manual (DOM), Chapter 3-Personnel, Training and Employee Relations, Article 18-General Training, Section 32010.19.11-Less Lethal Weapons, Chapter 8, Article 46, Section 86010.24– Expandable Baton
  • California Penal Code, Sections 832 and 835
  • CPOST General Training Standard GS001

 

 

PA003 - OLEORESIN CAPSICUM (OC)

OLEORESIN CAPSICUM (OC) STANDARD
PA003

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1):  The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices. 

BACKGROUND

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) has authorized the use of Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) products as a less lethal option for Parole Agents (PA) in the performance of their duties.  While on duty, those parole agents authorized by the Division of Adult Parole Operations (DAPO) policy to carry OC, shall only carry dispensers approved and issued by DAPO.

STANDARD

All PAs shall be trained in CDCR’s  policies and procedures concerning OC and demonstrate the skills and abilities required to safely use and deliver approved formats of OC in accordance with the CDCR use of force policy.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

PAs will have the knowledge and skills necessary to provide for their safety and the safety of others when confronted with a difficult situation. When faced with the decision to use force, PAs will ensure the use of force complies with the law, Department policy, and is appropriate for the situation. If OC pepper spray is used, PAs will be able to:

  • Properly deploy OC pepper spray
  • Properly decontaminate an affected person/area
  • If necessary, when safe to do so, render first aid after use of OC pepper spray
  • Write special incident reports after using OC pepper spray

CITATIONS

  • Chapter 8, Article 39 Parole Agent Equipment, 85050.1 Policy, Standard Equipment
  • Chapter 8, Article 46, 86010.11 Parole Agent Arming
  • Chapter 8, Article 46, 86010.15 Required Equipment for Quarterly Firearms Training
  • Chapter 8, Article 46, 86010.35 Chemical Agent policy
  • Chapter 8, Article 86010.36 Relinquishing Chemical Agent Policy
PA004 - VEHICLE OPERATIONS

VEHICLE OPERATIONS STANDARD
PA004

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1):  The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices. 

BACKGROUND

Driving is an integral function of a Parole Agent’s (PA) job duties.  All caseloads require vehicle travel to complete supervision specifications. All PAs are authorized to utilize state owned vehicles in order to conduct work outside of their office.

STANDARD

All PAs shall receive training in proper vehicle operation. The training shall encompass policies and rules governing the use of state vehicles, the importance of defensive and distracted driving principles, and techniques for safe driving habits.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

This training will consist of safe driving principles and techniques in:

  • Rural areas/Urban areas
  • Inclement weather/Various times of day and night

The training will also consist of instruction on the proper procedures for:

  • Vehicle maintenance
  • Mileage log and other required documents
  • Accident reporting procedures

CITATIONS

  • DOM Chapter 8, Article 10, 82000.1 Policy
  • DOM Chapter 8, Article 10, 82000.3 Responsibilities
  • DOM Chapter 8, Article 10, 82000.4 Vehicle Assignment
  • DOM Chapter 8, Article 10, 82000.5 Use of State Vehicle
  • DOM Chapter 8, Article 10, 82000.7 Use of State Issued Vehicles, Vehicle Home Storage Permit
  • DOM Chapter 8, Article 10, 82001 Use of the State Voyager Card
  • DOM Chapter 8, Article 10, 82002.1 Defensive Driver Training
  • MOU Article XIX, 19.01 C
  • Directive 15-07, Memorandum dated July 28, 2015
  • State Administrative Manual, Sections 0750, 0751, 0752
PA005 - USE OF AUTOMATED APPLICATIONS AND DIGITAL RESOURCES

USE OF AUTOMATED APPLICATIONS AND DIGITAL RESOURCES STANDARD
PA005

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1):  The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices. 

BACKGROUND

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) uses real-time information and electronic files in managing and accessing offenders’ information. In addition, the Division of Adult Parole Operations (DAPO) has a system designed to electronically submit correspondence to both internal and external stakeholders where system interface can be accomplished.  While in the field, Parole Agents (PAs) are able to remotely access and update specific database fields via use of a State-issued device.

STANDARD

All parole agents (PAs) shall be proficient in the use of all electronic case management applications utilized in managing a caseload. 

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

At a minimum, PAs shall utilize the following electronic case management applications and database tools to assist them in managing a caseload:

  • Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions (COMPAS)
  • Disability and Effective Communication System (DECS)
  • Electronic In-Home Detention (EID)
  • Electronic Records Management System (ERMS)
  • Parole Violation Disposition Tracking System (PVDTS)
  • Parole Violation Decision Making Instrument (PVDMI)
  • Strategic Offender Management System (SOMS)
  • Virtual Integrated Mobile Office (VIMO)
  • Other specialized applications and database tools utilized in specified assignments

Through use of the various platforms and databases, PAs shall have real-time accessibility to case management resources and secure information sharing for efficient offender management.

CITATIONS

  • PC 3015(b) Article 2.3. Parole Reentry Accountability Program
  • DOM Chap. 4 Information Technology 41010.1 Policy
  • DOM Chap 8. Parole Agent Equipment, Article 39, 5.1 State-Issued Cell Phones
  • CCR Subchapter 6 Adult Parole, Article 19, 3768 Parole Violation Decision Making Instrument (PVDMI)
  • CCR Subchapter 6 Adult Parole, Article 19, 3768.3 Utilization of the Parole Violation Decision Making Instrument (PVDMI)
  • Administrative Bulletin Policy Memoranda:
    1. Policy # 17-05 VIMO Policy
    2. Policy # 15-15 Policy and Procedures for the Electronic In-Home Detention Program
    3. Policy #13-04 Introduction of the Parole Violation Disposition and Tracking System
  • Directives Memoranda:
    • # 15-10: Mandatory Use of SOMs and the CalParole Deactivation Procedures
    • # 15-5: Discharge Review Reports Utilizing Parole Violation Disposition and Tracking System
    • #13-05: Mandatory Strategic Offender Management System Training
  • Memoranda dated 4/17/09: Mandatory Training for Basic Computer Operation and Disability and Effective Communication System Data Entry
  • Memoranda dated 3/9/09: Mandatory Statewide Parole Violation Decision Making Instrument (PVDMI) Training
  • Memoranda dated 4/26/12: INFORMATIONAL – Strategic Offender Management System – Holds, Warrants, and Detainers
  • Memoranda dated 3/6/12: INFORMATIONAL – Self-Paced Online Strategic Offender Management System Training
  • Memoranda dated 1/5/07: INFORMATIONAL – Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions Assessment
PA006 - FIREARMS TRAINING

FIREARMS TRAINING STANDARD
PA006

 AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

All Parole Agents (PAs) hired after January 1, 1988, shall be armed while on-duty and issued a firearm upon successful completion of the Basic Parole Agent Academy (BPAA) or a departmentally approved firearms training course.  PAs appointed prior to January 1, 1988 shall have the discretion to be armed while on-duty.

All PAs shall be able to perform their duties utilizing sound judgement in order to maintain staff safety and protect the public. PAs are responsible to keep their firearm well maintained and in good working order. When on duty, PAs shall have in their possession the required safety equipment in addition to their firearm when required.

STANDARD

PAs shall initially complete Penal Code 832 training or a Division approved firearms course. PAs shall requalify quarterly on approved weapons (firearms) and receive annual firearms training.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

To successfully complete the firearms training, PAs shall:

  1. Recognize safety as a top priority in all firearms training
  2. Receive training on safety equipment and protocols in the use of a firearm
  3. Receive training on the limitations an agent may encounter during diminished light/night time conditions
  4. Receive training on static and dynamic conditions, including weapons malfunction scenarios
  5. Receive training on when to write a detailed synopsis of occurrence for when a firearm is discharged outside of a training venue, record the information on the appropriate reporting forms, and understand the required reporting protocols

CITATIONS

  • California Law, Penal Code Section 832, 835(a)
  • California Law, Penal Code 13510
  • Chapter 8, Article 46, 86010.11 Parole Agent Arming
  • DOM Chapter 8, Article 46, 86010.3 Parole Agent Firearm
  • Peace Officers and Standards of Training, Learning Domain 35: Firearms
  • CPOST General Training Standard GS001 – KSA Standards
PA007 - PAROLE AGENT SAFETY TACTICS (PAST)

PAROLE AGENT SAFETY TACTICS (PAST)
STANDARD
PA007

AUTHORITY

California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

While on duty, Parole Agents (PAs) are expected to respond effectively and professionally. When use of force is appropriate, PAs shall have the knowledge, skills and abilities to defend themselves and others, while apprehending and arresting parolees. Proper training on the use of Parole Agent Safety Tactics (PAST) will increase professionalism and reduce the risk of injury or death. 

STANDARD

All PAs shall receive PAST training at least annually, in accordance with California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) policy.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

  1. When confronted with a use of force scenario, PAs will be able to analyze and evaluate the situation and apply their knowledge skills and abilities appropriately.
  2. PAs will be able to understand and apply the correct force option that complies with state and federal law and departmental policies.
  3. Training will simulate real life situations within safety training guidelines.
  4. Participants will perform the objectives in the approved PAST curriculum.

CITATIONS

  • California Law, Penal Code Section 832, 835(a)
  • California Law, Penal Code 13510
  • Chapter 8, Article 46, 86010.11 Parole Agent Arming
  • DOM Chapter 8, Article 46, 86010.3 Parole Agent Firearm
  • Peace Officers and Standards of Training, Learning Domain 35: Firearms
  • CPOST General Training Standard GS001 – KSA Standard
PA008 - CASEWORK MANAGEMENT

CASEWORK MANAGEMENT STANDARD
PA008
 

 AUTHORITY

This section California Penal Code 13601(a)(1): The CPOST shall develop, approve, and monitor standards for the selection and training of state correctional peace officer apprentices.

BACKGROUND

It is the mission of the Division of Adult Parole Operations (DAPO) to increase public safety through effective parole supervision, and rehabilitative strategies to successfully reintegrate offenders into our community.  Parole Agents (PAs) will work collaboratively with law enforcement agencies, community providers and programs, and serve as a positive role model to foster a supportive environment that will create favorable conditions for parolees to successfully re-integrate back into the community.

The three major principles of evidence-based casework management are Risks, Needs and Responsivity. DAPO’s goal of public safety may be attained by targeting the parolee’s criminogenic needs. Criminogenic needs are traits and conditions that when present increases the likelihood that someone will commit a crime.

Effective Casework Management is essential to the success of this mission.

STANDARD

All PAs will be trained in Casework Management incorporating critical thinking, effective communication, time management, multi-tasking skills, research skills, and stress management pursuant to Department policy and State and Federal law.

COMPONENTS OF STANDARD

A critical component of Casework Management is the understanding of criminogenic needs and using critical risk and needs assessment tool(s).

  1. PAs will receive training to conduct face to face contacts in the community (i.e., parolee’s residence, employment, school, etc.) to confirm the parolee’s compliance with their conditions of parole and program participation.
  2. PAs will receive training in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to perform Casework Management according to departmental policy.
  3. PAs will receive training to make recommendations in administrative or judicial proceedings for parole violations and other court hearings pursuant to DAPO policies and State Laws.
  4. PAs will receive training in the utilization of departmental electronic databases and tools in the management of their caseload.
  5. PAs will receive training on how to locate and interpret information regarding a parolee’s criminal behavior. This information will assist a PA when completing Special Conditions of Parole (SCOP) and addressing criminogenic needs.

CITATIONS

  • Penal Code 3016 Article 2.4 Case Management Reentry Pilot Program
  • Memorandum dated October 5, 2016 – 3 Years to Excellence
  • DOM Chapter 8, Article 9, Caseload Management May 29, 2019
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